The inspiration for the Adam and Eve story came partly from Enkidu's origin in the Epic of Gilgamesh

March 11, 2015, 4:30 pm

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The debate "The inspiration for the Adam and Eve story came partly from Enkidu's origin in the Epic of Gilgamesh" was started by I_Voyager on March 11, 2015, 4:30 pm. 9 people are on the agree side of this discussion, while 14 people are on the disagree side. People are starting to choose their side. It looks like most people are against to this statement.

I_Voyager posted 1 argument to the agreers part.
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I_Voyager, stormshy, Dictator, ufufugh, daddyfantastic, transfanboy and 3 visitors agree.
Cody, wmd, ItsMateo, debunkmyths, Damn3d and 9 visitors disagree.

THIS IS A JOKE RIGHT?

4 years, 8 months ago

Parallels:
- Enkidu is made by the gods from the dirt to be a companion to Gilgamesh.
- He begins with no knowledge, living in a beautiful forest in which he is perfectly suited and in which all his needs are met.
- He is introduced by someone to a temptress and he lies with her for six days and seven nights.
- When he tries to go back to the forest he can`t survive there anymore and is ejected from it. When he asks the temptress why, she says ``It is because you have wisdom now.``

``Eating the apple`` is metaphorically similar to our ``popping the cherry``. The result is the same, when he gives into the woman and tastes the forbidden pleasure, his reward is wisdom and he is forced to leave the forest of plenty and forge his destiny in the world of human knowledge. Both may be derived from the cultural impact of neolithic nomadic tribes leaving the forest and inventing agriculture at times when food became more scarce in the forest. It seems plausible that the Adam and Eve story`s author was influenced by this story and used it as a framework for his metaphorical structure.

4 years, 9 months ago
Discuss "The inspiration for the Adam and Eve story came partly from Enkidu's origin in the Epic of Gilgamesh" history philosophy religion
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