Was the earth ever fully underwater and did plants come first

June 2, 2017, 12:11 am

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The debate "Was the earth ever fully underwater and did plants come first" was started by neveralone on June 2, 2017, 12:11 am. 8 people are on the agree side of this discussion, while 2 people are on the disagree side. It looks like most of the people in this community are on the agreeing side of this statement.

Etabob posted 1 argument, makson posted 1 argument to the disagreers part.

PsychDave, Marlize and 6 visitors agree.
makson, Etabob disagree.

Nemiroff
replied to...

it's not about water having ingredients, it's about being a liquid medium for chemical reactions of life to happen.

it is currently believed that life started attached to walls near hydrothermic vents where nutrients and other ingredients literally flowed directly through them.

if anything the classic belief was that it started in small muddy puddles because there is no way a vast ocean will be able to concebtrate enough ingredients into small enough areas for reactions to happen in significant rates.

2 years, 5 months ago
makson
replied to...

true because if earth was ever fully underwater metals at the surface would all be wicked

2 years, 5 months ago

Nemiroff is very close to correct, life on Earth started in the ocean. No where else on the planet contained enough "ingrediants" so to speak, to create organisms other than the ocean. The Earth's core radiated warmth, salt nourished along with hydrating water. All of these things lead to one of our most important steps in history...evolution.

2 years, 5 months ago

well apparently god created the earth i didn't believe it untill I read it in a book

2 years, 5 months ago

the first big life was animal underwater. plants were first on land, but not overall.

2 years, 5 months ago
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